DIY Candied Orange Peel

Candied orange peel isn’t something I normally use in my baking, but that’s mostly because until recently, I never had it on hand. I also never realized how good it can be! However, I recently was asked to try making some Glazed Orange Scones. I put together a “Have a Confession?” page, where anyone can request a certain kind of recipe they’d like to see on this site, and these scones were requested, so I knew it was time to get myself some candied orange peel. Funny thing is, I never even thought of buying it, but instead jumped to find a recipe to make my own. I’m so glad I did, because these peels are amazing (and they also smell amazing while they’re cooking!)

Note: Since making this Candied Orange Peel, I’ve been experimenting with candying other types of citrus peels. See this page for some tips when using other types of citrus.

Here are the step-by-step instructions with photos (full recipe below):

To begin, rinse 3 navel or valencia oranges.

Cut the top and bottom off each orange and score the skin into quarters.

Remove the skin (peel and pith, the white part), and cut the skin into strips about 1/4″ wide. Wrap the oranges in plastic wrap to store for other use.

Place the strips of peel in a large saucepan and cover with cold water.

Set on the stove on high heat and bring to a boil. Drain the water from the peels and repeat this process twice more.

In a small bowl, whisk together 1 1/2 cups sugar and 3/4 cup water.

Pour into a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer. Let the mixture cook for 8-9 minutes at a constant simmer.

Add the peel and cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, adjusting heat as necessary to maintain the simmer. Avoid stirring, as this will cause crystallation. If necessary, swirl the pan to make sure that all of the peels get covered with the syrup. At the end of this period, the peels should be translucent.

Drain any remaining syrup from the peels and set aside for other use (perhaps tea?!) There will probably be only a tablespoon or two of syrup left. Spread the peels out on a drying rack and leave to dry for 4-5 hours. Store in an airtight container.


4.7 from 30 reviews
DIY Candied Orange Peel
Serves: about 2½ cups
 
Ingredients
  • 3 navel or valencia oranges
  • 1½ cups granulated sugar
  • ¾ cup water
Instructions
  1. Rinse the oranges.
  2. Cut the top and bottom off each orange and score the skin into quarters.
  3. Remove the skin (peel and pith, the white part), and cut the skin into strips about ¼" wide. Wrap the oranges in plastic wrap to store for other use.
  4. Place the strips of peel in a large saucepan and cover with cold water.
  5. Set on the stove on high heat and bring to a boil. Drain the water from the peels and repeat this process twice more.
  6. In a small bowl, whisk together the sugar and ¾ cup water.
  7. Pour the sugar water into a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer. Let the mixture cook for 8-9 minutes at a constant simmer.
  8. Add the peel and cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, adjusting heat as necessary to maintain the simmer. Avoid stirring, as this will cause crystallation. If necessary, swirl the pan to make sure that all of the peels get covered with the syrup. At the end of this period, the peels should be translucent.
  9. Drain any remaining syrup from the peels and set aside for other use (perhaps tea?!) There will probably be only a tablespoon or two of syrup left. Spread the peels out on a drying rack and leave to dry for 4-5 hours. Store in an airtight container.

Recipe adapted from: Food Network

{ 149 comments… read them below or add one }

sarah February 5, 2012

My mom brought in a orange the moment i clicked on this page. fate?

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 6, 2012

I think so! Make the peel!!

Reply

Averie @ Love Veggies and Yoga February 5, 2012

These look awesome! I saw them on FG…congrats.

I want to make these!
Averie @ Love Veggies and Yoga recently posted..Homemade TwinkiesMy Profile

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 6, 2012

Do try making them! They’re sooo good :) Thanks for the comment.

Reply

Mel (Sharky Oven Gloves) February 5, 2012

I keep coming across recipes that call for candied orange peel, but never have any on hand – this wonderful-looking homemade candied peel looks like the solution to that!!
Mel (Sharky Oven Gloves) recently posted..World Domination vs. mini-croissantsMy Profile

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 6, 2012

The candied peel really adds to bread, scones, etc. I hope you try making the peel soon, and let me know what you think!

Reply

Agne February 6, 2012

Wow! Definitely going to make it.
Agne recently posted..Orange Ice – CreamMy Profile

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 6, 2012

Good! They’re delicious!

Reply

Cathy @ Savory Notes February 6, 2012

i wonder if candied lime peels would be good too… gonna try these soon :)
Cathy @ Savory Notes recently posted..Brew 52: Week 3 – Dale Bros California Black BeerMy Profile

Reply

Sarah February 6, 2012

I just made candied citrus peels today with lemons and mandarins and they were also tasty!

Your orange peels look great!

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 6, 2012

MMM! Sounds amazing! And Thank You :)

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 6, 2012

I bet they would be! This was my first foray into doing candied peel. It worked out so well that I wouldn’t mind trying lime/lemon/mandarin/grapefruit/etc. myself!

Reply

The Steaming Pot February 6, 2012

What a lovely idea! Beautiful pictures. Will try these., thanks for sharing.
The Steaming Pot recently posted..Pineapple RaitaMy Profile

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 6, 2012

Thank you thank you! Please let me know what you think when you make the peel! I’d love to hear :)

Reply

myfudo February 6, 2012

I am a fan of DIY posts! I love the orange theme…esp the plaid tablecloth. Thanks for the post!
myfudo recently posted..easy desserts & recipes: oh, look! a rainbow! (cake)My Profile

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 6, 2012

Good to here! I just got the tablecloth, and I’m loving it :) Thanks for stopping by!

Reply

Amanda February 8, 2012

We love this simple and informative recipe! Candied orange peels are amazing- and just like you- we never thought to make them ourselves! We can’t wait to try these out! Our Food Lovers would love this recipe! Feel free to share on our community page! http://bit.ly/wlZhX4

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 10, 2012

Thanks! I stopped by the site. Glad to know of it :)

Reply

Christin February 17, 2012

I’m making these for a gender neutral, orange themed baby shower. They are going to look great AND be so tasty! :)

Reply

brighteyedbaker February 17, 2012

What a great idea! I love it :)

Reply

Barbara September 24, 2012

How long will these candied peels last? Should they be refrigerated?

Reply

brighteyedbaker September 25, 2012

They last for a good amount of time – a few months, at least. I don’t refrigerate mine; I just keep them in the pantry. Hope that helps :)

Reply

Gillian October 31, 2012

Can anyone who has made this recipe comment on how firm the peel becomes while it is stored? I have to candy long “strings” of peel to drape over a cake, so I need it to be fairly pliable, not stiff. Thanks very much!

Reply

alexandra November 2, 2012

The peels don’t stay “stringy” as I imagine you are aiming for them to be. I’m actually not sure that I’ve seen anything like that before. I’d be interested to know if you come across anything though!

Reply

Emma July 18, 2014

I know this answer is too late for you but might help others. I think what you wanted is orange peel spirals – not really candied orange peel. (Like long strips of orange zest – not as tasty as candied orange but more decorative).

To make the spirals there’s a tool or you can carefully use a paring knife or any knife with a sharp point – peel a narrow section, avoiding the pith as much as possible. You want the peel to be almost transparent because the pith is the bitter part; also the peel is more flexible w/o the pith. Easiest way is to pierce the skin and then rotate the orange around the knife (more chance of cutting yourself though!). You could also cut wider spirals around the orange; then afterwards you could split them into narrow spirals. After peeling, lightly moisten and roll/dust in either finely granulated sugar or powdered sugar. The old method is to paint with egg white before dusting, but I’d avoid raw egg in case someone actually eats the peel. It’s like using orange zest but a zester would probably not make long enough strips before breaking. FYI – haven’t tried yet but was thinking of experimenting with corn syrup instead of egg white to see if sugar sticks better to the peel.

Reply

alexandra July 21, 2014

Thanks for sharing all your tips Emma!

Reply

Louise November 7, 2012

I’ve no idea why, but mine burned 30 minutes into the cooking time. They were on the lowest simmer on my stove’s smallest burner. Not sure what to do next time to avoid this. Any ideas? Thanks. :)

Reply

alexandra November 7, 2012

That’s strange; I’ve never had that happen to me, nor have I heard from anyone else who has tried the recipe that this has happened. My only thought would be to make sure you are swirling the pan around occasionally while the peels cook. If the peels get translucent earlier than the 45 minutes stated in the recipe, you could take them off the stove then, which might help. I hope you give it another go!

Reply

Julian November 24, 2013

Hello, I just had the same problem as Louise, 20 min and burned. Lowest stove’s burner, I followed the recipe from A to Z.

Reply

alexandra November 26, 2013

Hmm, that’s strange, but my recommendation would be to keep it at the lowest heat and cook just until the peels turn translucent, rather than the whole 45 min-1 hour. Sorry you had trouble!

Reply

Emma July 18, 2014

It might be that your burners are hotter than other stoves (commercial stoves are – and the ‘look-like-commercial’ home stoves sometimes have high btu’s). Also I have electric stove and hate it compared to gas. I don’t have this problem but you might try using a double boiler so the gentle water heat below might alleviate the burning. Also make sure the pan is thick – some of the thin walled inexpensive pans can heat excessively and have hot spots. (I know this is an older question but posting my response in case it helps others.)

Reply

Evelyn December 11, 2012

After searching where to buy candied orange peel, I came across recipes to make them instead. I need for a recipe. So having oranges on hand I gave it a go. Mine too began to brown at the bottom, even at my lowest setting. But I did let mine cook for the 45min. Glad I took them off when I did or they would have burnt. They taste delicious, glad I made them. I will be making again.

Reply

alexandra December 12, 2012

I’m not sure why the orange peels would have started to brown. Maybe your pan isn’t very thick? I’m glad it all worked out though!

Reply

cathy December 13, 2012

I tried making these. I’m not sure if i did this correctly. They still taste a little bitter. And I saw some other websites that tossed the orange peels in sugar after they were drained. Was I supposed to do that? Thanks!

Reply

alexandra December 13, 2012

When I made the candied orange peels for this post, I didn’t toss them in sugar at the end, but I later tried the same recipe with Meyer lemons and I did toss those in sugar. Really, it’s a matter of preference, as long as your peels are still just wet enough for the sugar to stick. If they taste bitter, you probably need to try blanching them more than the three times called for in the recipe. Hope that helps!

Reply

Cheri November 21, 2013

Mine also turned out a little bitter. They haven’t dried completely just yet & I sprinkled them with some sugar. I have an induction cooktop and I did reboil them 3 times. Next time I will blanch 4-5 times. Thanks for the recipe & all the feedback on questions!

Reply

alexandra November 26, 2013

Extra blanching should do the trick, and sprinkling them with some granulated sugar is a good idea regardless. ;) Hope your first batch is still sweet enough to be tasty!

Reply

Lori January 13, 2013

On a recent business trip, my breakfast berries included tiny candied orange peel strips that were delicious. I wanted to try to make orange peels my self and thanks to your recipe, the orange peels turned our perfectly! Thank you for the clear and beautifully photographed recipe. Your step by step instructions gave me confidence that I could make these.

Reply

alexandra January 14, 2013

Wow, thank you so much for taking the time to let me know! It make my day knowing that this post helped you out so much. :) And now you can enjoy the candied orange peel whenever you want!

Reply

Sue January 14, 2013

Hi. I am Gging to make some and as I have been eating oranges I have cut and frozen the peel. I have quite a few now so I wanted to make a lot in one go so do you have a weight ratio for the sugar and water solution? Thanks.

Reply

alexandra January 14, 2013

The weight ratio would be 1 3/4 ounces sugar to every 1 ounce of water. (Based on the amount of orange peel used in the recipe as listed, this comes out to 10 1/2 ounces sugar to 6 ounces of water). Hope that helps!

Reply

Samia February 10, 2013

Please help, I tried to make candied peel but somehow its turned out quite bitter. I did discard the water after the first boil. Could I still pick up the receipe from the second boil?

Reply

alexandra February 10, 2013

I’m a little confused by what you mean. Did you try this recipe and end up with bitter orange peels, or another recipe? If you followed through with the entire recipe then you would be far past the first boil. If you could maybe explain your problem a little more I’d be happy to try to help:)

Reply

sena February 17, 2013

I tried this today for my florentines. It came out a bit hard XD probably I cooked too long.. but still amazingly yummy and useful. I’ll try again with asian citruses later! Thank you for your great and easy recipe!

Reply

alexandra February 24, 2013

Well, I’m glad you still liked the peels even if they weren’t perfect! You’re welcome, and I’d love to hear if you try the recipe out again and fix the problem of the peels being a bit hard.

Reply

Zara from Ireland February 22, 2013

I love the way that you give so many really good
photographs with the recipes.

It is very reassuring to check every now and then
that your picture of the pan looks vaguely like mine!

I am new to this site but I am really enjoying it.
Great comments too from all the other “followers”

Reply

alexandra February 24, 2013

Thanks, I’m so glad to hear that! It’s great to know that the step-by-step photos were helpful. :)

Reply

kstobias March 4, 2013

Just made these and they’re wonderful! I’m glad I read the other comments because I tend to walk away from food that needs a while to simmer. I used a cast iron skillet so took them off after only 20 minutes because they were already turning translucent and I wanted them to stay a little gummy. They were perfect after I rolled them in sugar and I even added the syrup to my tea! Best cup this year!

Reply

alexandra March 5, 2013

Well I’m so glad you figured out what would work best for you BEFORE you started the recipe, so you ended up happy instead of frustrated! Every stove is different, and as you mentioned, so are pots/skillets/etc. Good thinking with using your judgement! Thanks for letting me know about your experience with the recipe; I’m happy you tried it. :)

Reply

Stone works March 22, 2013

What about using an apple peeler machine for long strips??
Can’t wait to try it!!

Reply

alexandra March 22, 2013

I don’t have an apple peeler, but I would try it if I did! (Just make sure you still get the pith – the white part- in there.) That would be fun to have long strips!

Reply

Mary March 30, 2013

I used the orange juice in the sugar syrup and a dribble of elderflower cordial we had left over in the fridge as well as the water and sugar suggested by the recipe. The candied orange flavour is beautifully intense!

Reply

alexandra March 30, 2013

That sounds fantastic! Did you still use the full amount of water in the sugar syrup as stated in the recipe? And did you just use all the juice from the three oranges? I love the idea and want to give it a try next time I make these.

Reply

William April 14, 2013

I have been making candied Orange (and Lemon and Grapefruit) peel for some years now. My first recipes for the candied orange peel came 2 old cookbooks. “The Household Searchlight Recipe Book” copyright 1931 and “The Gourmet Cookbook Vol. 1″ copyright 1950. After cooking the peels until they are just tender, drain them and cook in a 2 parts sugar to 1 part water mixture to a temp of 230° F on a candy thermometer. Then allow them to cool in the sugar solution overnight. Place them on a cookie sheet and place in a 250° F oven until the surface is firm (The Household Searchlight) Or Cook until tender, scrape off the white pith with a spoon and then cook in the Sugar water mix to 230°F Drain in a coarse sieve, cool on a plate and roll in granulated sugar “The Gourmet Cookbook Vol. 1″

Other Freshly cooked, canned or dried fruits may also be candied this way with the temp taken to 234° F to 238° F. Allow to cool in the syrup overnight, drain, roll in sugar and place on a cookie sheet in a 250° F oven until the surface is firm. Peaches, apples, figs, prunes, quinces, citron, pineapple, plums, cherries and apricots may all be used. (The Household Searchlight”) I have no doubt many other fruits could also be used. The key is that the fruit must be cooked to tenderness before immersion in the syrup.

It is also possible to use food coloring in the syrup to tint the fruits to desired colors.

Reply

Becky Clark May 13, 2013

This is my second time making the orange peel. It is a keeper and just the right taste when I want something sweet.my 89 year old mom just loves them. Thank you for posting this.

Reply

Elaine May 20, 2013

As a suggestion for the left over syrup (i used to do candied lemon peel this way, or sometimes orange and lemon), i use the left over syrup to make “lemonade) by pouring a bit of soda water over it. My daughter’s friends love it. another use would be drizzling over vanilla icecream (or using in the icecream if making from scratch).

Reply

alexandra May 22, 2013

Both of those sound like awesome ideas! I especially love the soda water one since I love club soda with lemon or lime. Thanks for sharing!

Reply

June June 3, 2013

I am about to harvest my first crop of blood oranges (all seven!) and searched for a candied peel recipe to garnish chocolate mousse. This looks perfect thank you – I may dip one end in dark chocolate too – just in case there isn’t enough in the chocolate mousse!

Reply

alexandra June 4, 2013

Sounds so good. I love chocolate mousse! I say go for the extra dipping of chocolate; that’s certainly something I would do!

Reply

Anne Powers June 18, 2013

I needed candied orange peel for an Italian recipe “sfogliatelle”. After spending a Saturday driving around town I came across your site and decided to try making them myself. They turned out PERFECT!! Now…on to the hard part. Thank you for the great instructions.

Reply

alexandra June 19, 2013

That’s awesome! I’m so glad the recipe was helpful for you. :) Good luck with your sfogliatelle! It sounds like quite a pastry feat to accomplish!

Reply

katrina June 19, 2013

I am making these now. Taste good. I added lime extract and coconut flakes to mine. :)

Reply

alexandra June 19, 2013

Yay! Love that idea!

Reply

katrina June 19, 2013

I ended up making the orange scones too! They were amaaaaaaaazing!!! I had to replace cream with cream cheese and orange juice concentrate with just orange juice and then added some orange extract and lavender essential oil. Soooooo good! Thanks so much for these recipes. I used the leftover orange peel syrup and added that to jasmine tea. My friend and I loved this today!

Reply

Mina August 6, 2013

Hey! Thanks for this great recipe. I really liked the clear instructions and photos.

Unfortunately (due to my lack of knowledge of simple syrup-making rules and general newbieness) I still managed to burn the peels to a crisp!! They were black and could be snapped in half! The syrup stuck to the colander and my sink like concrete and I had to scrub with boiling water and detergent for ages haha

I think the syrup must have burnt as the orange peels smelt bad and it was dark brown. I thought it might have been ‘caramelizing’ haha

Only posting this so others can learn from my failure. I’ll try again soon and I’m sure they’ll work out :)

Reply

alexandra August 11, 2013

Oh no! That’s a bummer!
I don’t think you really want any caramelization going on here. :/ Definitely try it again and let me know how it goes! Make sure your simple syrup stays at a simmer the whole time the peels are cooking (no boiling!) and if the peels turn translucent before the time is up, take them off the heat early. Hope that helps!

Reply

Mina August 31, 2013

Hi again Alexandra,

I tried this recipe again, watching the syrup like a hawk (I also bought a candy thermometer to make sure it didn’t go above 112 degrees celcius). After 1.5 hours the peel was translucent. Probably because I used the smallest burner this time.

Anyway, they turned out great! Dipped them in dark choc…yum!

Thanks again :)

Reply

alexandra August 31, 2013

I’m so glad to hear it! I need to make some more myself and dip in dark chocolate… that sounds yummy! Thanks for letting me know. :)

Reply

lacey December 20, 2013

I also had trouble with the syrup becoming crystallized and the peels burning at 20 min. stove was on low the whole time but with big slow bubbles forming … ???? too hot or not hot enough idk.

Reply

alexandra December 23, 2013

It sounds like it must have been too hot, but that’s strange to me. Perhaps you should try using a more heavy-duty pan? Something with a light colored bottom might be helpful to for keeping a closer eye on the peels.
My other thought is that maybe you cooked your sugar down too much before adding the peel. Try cooking it less, that way it can simmer more, like you see in the photos, rather than bubbling really slowly, which suggests it is thick.

Reply

Jenny September 6, 2013

Made these this afternoon to go on a cake. They are dry but are so nice already! Really worth the effort. Will be making again!!

Reply

alexandra September 7, 2013

I’m glad you liked them! That’s a great idea to add them to cake; I’m already imagining a chocolate-orange cake in my future. :)

Reply

Kelly September 15, 2013

Trying this now! I think these would make a great garnish to top chocolate orange cupcakes with!

Reply

alexandra September 15, 2013

Agreed! I’d love to hear if you make a batch!

Reply

Kelly September 15, 2013

I made a first batch and it burned. Second patch seemed fine, but turned out very hard. Maybe I let it cook too long.

Reply

alexandra September 20, 2013

Oh no! If you try it again, I’d suggest stopping the cooking process as soon as the peels turn translucent, even if it doesn’t take as long as stated in the recipe. Also, make sure you keep the syrup at no more than a simmer.

Reply

Charlotte Crowder October 8, 2013

1st batch is drying now. 2nd batch is simmering. Trouble is we keep snacking on them. We may never know how they turn out after they dry. Trying whole orange slices now. They were kindof lame oranges so I figured they may be better off candied. Does this count as healthy since its all natural haha! Can I add vanilla and call them dreamcicle? Now I want to try lemons and limes and ginger! I guess you can naturally flavor hard candy and taffy??? I’m having one of those “what?! you can make CAKE out of flour and eggs and butter?? You don’t need a cake mix?!” moments.

Reply

alexandra October 10, 2013

That’s awesome! I think we can call it semi-healthy, right? At least it’s not cake! You tried whole orange slices with the orange itself?

Reply

Charlotte Crowder October 10, 2013

yes they were a little bit wet. they have sat for a day now and are crisping up. they taste just like candy orange slices. I will post them on my blog at merchant kitty and like back to you. they are gorgeous thanks for the post.
Charlotte Crowder recently posted..October Give AwayMy Profile

Reply

alexandra October 11, 2013

That sounds amazing! I’ll have to try it myself sometime. Glad you liked the post!

Reply

caz October 27, 2013

Just tried this with grapefruit. i ate the fruit for breakfast and then made the candied peel. it is superb, tastes like a grapefruit liquer but sticky, rich and sophisticated. it would grace the best restaurant so thanks for this recipe. i will add mine to xmas cake which i am baking this week. i will make this peel again soon – can’t live without it now….

Reply

alexandra October 27, 2013

Candied grapefruit peel sounds like an awesome idea! I need to try that. :)
Did you use pink grapefruit?

Reply

Kareen October 30, 2013

If you are using orange peel for baking, boiling it three times cooks all of the flavor out of the peel. Best to do it just once to keep that zesty flavor in the peel so it will be noticable in your baked goods. Also, peel it in thin strips.

Reply

alexandra November 5, 2013

I baked with my peel and it definitely still had good orange flavor, but perhaps it varies by the orange you start with. Thanks for the tip!

Reply

Paul November 1, 2013

I’m trying this recipe a bit modified right now with Seville oranges. By squeezing and boiling them first it becomes very easy to scoop whatever is left out of the peel. I’ve also used the juice instead of water to make the syrup.

Reply

alexandra November 1, 2013

Juice sounds like a great idea! And thanks for the advice on the peel!

Reply

Andrea December 18, 2013

Agree three boils saps some of the orange flavor, but it gets rid of the bitterness. To add some zing back to the peels, I add a tablespoon of lemon juice. Delicious!

Reply

Andrea December 18, 2013

To be more specific, I add a tablespoon of lemon juice to the sugar syrup.

Reply

alexandra December 23, 2013

Great idea; thank you so much for sharing Andrea!

Reply

Janet November 2, 2013

I just brought home a commercial electric peeler to test for my business and it peels the oranges in two layers. the orange peel first then the pith so I am going to try this recipe without the pith and see how it goes. Any suggestions?

Reply

alexandra November 5, 2013

Hmm… I haven’t tried doing it without the pith so I’m not sure how much of a difference it will make. The pith is the bitter part though, so you might not need to blanch the peels three times; maybe just once? Let me know how it goes!

Reply

Janet November 5, 2013

Actually they came up pretty well. It got a bit messy timing wise because I kept peeling more oranges with the industrial peeler and the brew smelled so good that I got a bit carried away and kept throwing more in the pot. Consequently the strips had a variable cooktime with some being harder and some being softer. Plus i kept throwing more sugar and water in too so the ratios were dodgy. Nevertheless when I pulled out these glossy, dripping strings of peel and cut them in to 2.5″ lengths they dried and crystallized beautifully. I intend to use some for my Christmas fruit cakes and dip some in chocolate for gifts – that’s if my family don’t eat the lot first – I keep finding the lid of the box I have them store in a bit open on the corners and it seems to be getting lighter and lighter. Might have to make some more. I had so much syrup lieft over that i added fresh orange juice, butter and boiled it till it turned into orange butterscotch toffee sauce. I bottled three jars for my three blokes (My dad, My father in law and my husband) for their Xmas hampers.

Reply

alexandra November 6, 2013

Hah, well I’m glad it turned out good in the end! Your orange butterscotch toffee sauce idea is KILLING me. I’d love to know how you made it!

Reply

Daniela February 28, 2014

Janet could you post the recipe for the butterscotch? Am just wondering what to do with all the syrup left over – seems such a waste to throw it away!x

Reply

Jill Nassif November 7, 2013

This recipe I am sure is very tasty but it is supposed to be coated in a last step of being shaken or rolled in sugar granules to prevent sticking and makes them sparkly looking. Similar to a sour patch kid candy. :)

Reply

alexandra November 7, 2013

You’re right; they should be dipped in sugar! I actually have done this before with other types of candied peel (like here). I should add that step to this recipe. Thanks for the suggestion!

Reply

Hajnalka November 17, 2013

I worry about chemicals/pesticides. Does anyone know: If I use organic fruit, can I be pretty sure they have not been sprayed? (Sorry if this seems obvious.)
THANKS for this excellent method! I plan to do both orange and lemon and use them in my Christmas Stollen.

Reply

alexandra November 20, 2013

Unfortunately, I don’t know that you can be positive about whether fruit has been sprayed even if it is organic. Perhaps you have a family member of friends with their own orange tree who will lend you a few?

Reply

Lili December 5, 2013

Thank you for this recipe, Alexandra! I made the candied orange peel and used it in mincemeat for this ice cream – http://www.weallscream.net/post/69065461558/mincemeat
Lili recently posted..Sweet boozy (vegetarian) mincemeat in a vanilla brandy ice…My Profile

Reply

alexandra December 7, 2013

I’m glad you liked it!

Reply

Sydney December 6, 2013

Found your recipe-love the step by step and pics!!! Going to make them now!!!

Reply

alexandra December 7, 2013

Oh good; enjoy!

Reply

marla December 11, 2013

Made my peels to mince and top my dark chocolate-pistachio Christmas Bark. Couldn’t resist adding a light dusting of cinnamon to the simmering simple syrup- yum! Thanks for your great directions and beautiful pictures. Homemade is best!

Reply

alexandra December 13, 2013

Oooh, sounds fantastic! I’ve made a similar chocolate bark with dark chocolate, pistachios, and dried cranberries, but adding orange is a fabulous idea!

Reply

Kerry December 12, 2013

I took off some of the pith before boiling – I thought my oranges had particularly thick ones. I know the pith is bitter. Also, make sure the boil is rolling – I let each go a minute or so. This is the second year I have made them. I roll them in sugar and then dip some in bittersweet chocolate. They taste like a fresh version of those gummy orange slices. I also use some in gingerbread – frost the top with cream cheese frosting and then sprinkle some small diced on top as well. My 11 year old is a peel junkie – I have to hide them from her so I have some for Christmas. I am trying the lemon this year – I am just going to throw them in with the oranges. The syrup ought to be awesome.

Reply

alexandra December 13, 2013

Sounds amazing with the chocolate! Thank you so much for sharing and I’m so glad you’re enjoying the peels. The gingerbread also sounds incredible. :)

Reply

ashleya December 24, 2013

YUMMY LOOKING! Mine turned out so hard and tough. What way to avoid this? I may have over-cooked.. What do you think??

Reply

alexandra December 28, 2013

It sounds like you probably overcooked them, or perhaps let them dry out too long. For cooking, don’t feel like you have to go with the full amount of time; instead, go by the visual cues and stop when the peels have turned translucent.

Reply

Lucy December 24, 2013

To make them les bítter, add half spoon of baking soda to the first boiling water

Reply

alexandra December 28, 2013

That makes a lot of sense. Thanks for the tip!

Reply

Steffanie December 28, 2013

I made these a year ago to add to a molasses cookie recipe. The candied orange peel was fantastic! I followed the recipe exactly. The cookies were great, and the extra peel got swirled in tea, and nibbled on as a snack. I did manage to have a bit left for another batch of molasses cookies recently. I think they were reaching the end of their shelf life, but I have no complaints! I’m about to make more, and very glad to have found the recipe again! Thanks!

Reply

alexandra December 29, 2013

I’m glad to hear you’ve enjoyed them so much! They do have a pretty long shelf life, and even when they get a bit tough, they seem fine once baked into something. Your molasses cookies sound yummy!

Reply

aruna sambhares December 30, 2013

I want to make these because ready made are not good.

Reply

Daphne December 30, 2013

I just made some orange peels, and they are very nice, although the whole process took more than 2 hours (I’m very, very slow at cooking).
Anyway, after boiling the peels 4 times, I tasted them to see if it was bitter, and they still were a bit. Even after the shimmering part (which lasted a bit over an hour for me), there is still a hint of bitterness in them.
So I guess it depends on the oranges, but next time I’ll make sure the peels are not at all bitter before moving to the next step!

Reply

alexandra December 30, 2013

I think, like you said, it just depends on your oranges. You may want to try adding a bit of baking soda during the first blanching next time, as one reader suggested above. You can also dip them in sugar before you let them dry, which might help offset any bitterness. I’m glad you liked them nonetheless!

Reply

Arl girl December 31, 2013

Made this today after a recipe called Alsatian Gingerbread needed sugared lemon or orange. Wow, my husband says he’ll add it to old fashions and other drinks. Followed directions and it turned out beautifully. Drying right now on the rack. Thanks!

Reply

alexandra January 1, 2014

Oh I’m so glad! The candied peel has tons of good uses if you get creative. :)

Reply

elizabeth January 1, 2014

I just came back from Florida with a ton of oranges. I have this recipe on the stove right now. I can’t wait to try them!

Reply

alexandra January 1, 2014

Lucky you with fresh oranges! I hope they turned out well!

Reply

sharon January 1, 2014

My mother used to make this treat during the holidays. I am glad I found this recipe. It was very easy to make and so delicious. Brought back lots of memories to me.

Reply

alexandra January 3, 2014

Aww, that’s nice! I’m glad you found the recipe too!

Reply

Sando January 2, 2014

Making them right now – hope they turn out alright! Plan is to either use the candied peel in muffins/cakes or to make “orangettes”, a Southern French sweet (candied orange peels coated in dark chocolate that people like to eat at Christmas- yumm!)

Reply

alexandra January 3, 2014

I need to make some chocolate-covered orange peels myself! Sounds so good!

Reply

andrea January 6, 2014

I have a dwarf orange tree which tends to grow rather dry oranges, but the rind is often a nice bright orange color. I just tried them with your recipe and it came out well. Maybe I was simmering too low but it took more like 2 hours for the peel to go translucent. They have a slight bitter bite (my bad; when blanching I didn’t bring them to a full rolling boil), but I like the contrast.

Reply

alexandra January 7, 2014

Even if your oranges are a little dry, at least you can make some sweet candied peel out of them! The full boil on blanching should help for next time, and you might also try adding a bit of baking soda to the first boil as one reader suggested. You could try kicking the heat up a bit to make the peel cook faster, but just don’t go too high so you don’t burn them. :)

Reply

Freddie January 11, 2014

How long can they be stored?

Reply

alexandra January 12, 2014

I would say at least 6 months, and possibly longer. Just be sure to keep them in an airtight container. Storing them in sugar might also help them last longer.

Reply

Freddie January 14, 2014

Thank you! Can’t wait to try them!

Reply

Christina January 12, 2014

This is awesome! I used organic oranges to make sure the peels are without any chemicals and will use the candied peels in a fruitbread. They didn’t turn translucent though even after simmering for more than one hour. Still, very yummi, thanks for the recipe!

Reply

alexandra January 14, 2014

For some people, it takes a much shorter time to cook the peels, and for others it takes longer, depending on your stove. You can always simmer longer than an hour if you feel it’s needed. I’m glad they turned out well nonetheless!

Reply

Marie January 29, 2014

Just finished making these and have learned one important thing. You can cook these too long. I went to 55 minutes and the sugar started to caramelize and some of the peels in the middle of the pan got too hot and those peels are more like hard candy. The rest are GREAT! When making them again I will watch them more closely at the end of the cooking time.

Reply

alexandra February 3, 2014

You really have to judge by the look of the peels rather than the time you cook them; stoves always vary so cooking time will always vary. It’s all about visual cues!

Reply

arthur merahn February 7, 2014

reading this recipe takes me back 60 years sitting in my grandmothers kitchen in brooklyn, watching her do exactly the same steps while asking her how long before we could eat them, thanks! i really think i may give it a try art merahn

Reply

alexandra February 7, 2014

That’s so sweet! I hope you do; you may find it helpful to read through some of the comments as well before doing so. The biggest thing is to just make sure you don’t cook your peels too long. If they turn translucent faster than the recipe indicates, just stop cooking them. :)

Reply

Daniela February 27, 2014

Hi
Eagerly tried it today and followed the recipe meticulously…. result…. the sugar crystallised at the last moment (not having stirred it around at all – just swished the pan) and the oranges though having followed the step of boiling 3 times and starting afresh with fresh water each time the oranges still resulted bitter. Help! What happened?

Reply

Daniela February 28, 2014

Covered this lot in dark plain chocolate and actually the contrast between bitter and sweet has made them a HUGE success! Have just finished my second batch – this time blanched them 5 times, bought a heat diffuser and added an extra cup of water – perfect! Will so be writing this recipe down in my recipe organiser! Thank you so much!

Reply

alexandra March 5, 2014

I’m glad you were able to tweak the recipe to make it work perfectly for you! I somehow missed your first comment, so I’m sorry I wasn’t able to help you out sooner. :/
I still need to try dipping my peels in chocolate; it sounds amazing!

Reply

Jan February 28, 2014

Interesting recipe. I never really thought I can eat the orange peel, but this looks enticing. Thanks for sharing!

Reply

Donna March 1, 2014

Here is where I am confused. Some recipes call for removing the pith, others do not. In this recipe, you call for removing the pith but inthe pictures, it looks like the pith is still there. Isn’t the pith the wilt part of the orange?

Reply

alexandra March 5, 2014

The pith is the thick white skin underneath the peel. If you look at the second photo in the post, you can see how thick it is at the top of the orange. When you remove the pith, there’s still a layer of whitish-yellow connected to the peel which you can see in the third photo. This stays on. Otherwise, you’d just be left with zest. I hope that helps!

Reply

Analida March 2, 2014

I have some old family recipes that call for candied orange peel and have not been able to find it in the stores. I will definitely be linking back to your blog from my recipes. Thanks, I am thrilled!!!! Analida

Reply

alexandra March 5, 2014

That’s awesome! Thank you so much and I hope you like the candied peels. :)

Reply

Angela March 17, 2014

I’m so glad I found this! I’m making Barmbrack for St. Patrick’s Day and couldn’t find candied orange peel anywhere. I’m off to make some now :)
Angela recently posted..Our Red and Aqua Homeschool RoomMy Profile

Reply

alexandra March 17, 2014

Awesome! Sounds delish :)

Reply

hier gibt esgruppe March 29, 2014

Were a variety of volunteers plus starting up a whole new plan in our neighborhood. Your blog provided us worthwhile data to function about. You have done an amazing task plus all of our whole area could possibly be happy to your account.

Reply

Bronwyn July 7, 2014

Would this work for orange slices also and not just peel?

Reply

alexandra July 7, 2014

I haven’t tried it myself, but I did have one reader tell me she candied the whole slice with the peel, and that she just had to let it dry for a longer time in order to firm up. Maybe that will help?! :)

Reply

Trudy July 18, 2014

I just made these and they turned out brilliant. I am from the UK originally now in Oklahoma and I can’t get anything here thats why I tried this. I want to make an English farmhouse cake thats what these are for but can’t get currants ,do you have any thing for currants, I can buy raisins of both kinds but currants no hope…..love this site.

Reply

alexandra July 21, 2014

I’m so glad the peel worked out for you! Not sure about currants but perhaps you could try looking for them online! Good luck and thanks so much for your compliments!

Reply

Leave a Comment

Rate this recipe:  

CommentLuv badge

{ 10 trackbacks }